Education

All God's Children

School Choice

Common Core

   Some of our public schools struggle to produce graduates with adequate hard and soft life skills, yet taxpayer money continues to flow to these entities.  Alternatives such as school vouchers have shown tremendous benefits, but there is some entrenched opposition to utilization of these alternatives as in some way destructive of higher social goals.  If our schools as they exist are not helping eighty percent or more of all the students who are enrolled, Is it time for a redesign? 
  Milton Friedman spent many of his later years advocating for the freedom of choice in education. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman.  Where implemented, voucher systems seem to have provided tremendous results for the students who are able to say no to failing local schools.  Missouri has a checkered educational past, including that it was a felony to teach children of color even after the end of the War Between the States.  Dare I draw the parallel between public schools in modern times and no schools at all in those times?  The private schools on Illinois islands had graduates literate in language and grammar, and capable in mathematics.  There are models from a variety of states and municipalities that work, but we need the Federal Government out.
   In Mathematics alone, this might be a good idea.  In Science, the ranting of the "Chicken Little" Climate Change zealots makes me worry that consensus will control all, whereas science that is unsettled and debatable leads to continuous solutions sets.  Similarly, History should not be a settled science or field of study: the winners write the "winning" histories and stifle debate.  History is filled with events where the winners smashed the advances of leading cultures -- look at the Dark Ages.  Similarly Literature can descend into a politically correct utopia  -- books like Huckleberry Finn are moments from the banned list because they have words like "nigger," or they describe the need to be honest in self-reflection.  This is another central planning play to give us the wonderful 1984 gift of right think.  Local control works somewhat better than distant central control, especially when our academies exclude free thinkers who do not join in the consensus.

Article I Powers

   The gradual growth of Federal power in Education has not benefitted the people whom it was designed to benefit: schools in poverty settings only rarely achieve stellar individual and group goals.  Educational unions have shown tremendous resistance to positive change, whereas their members uniformly desire positive individual outcomes.  There is no Federal Constitutional authority granted for Education, and under the doctrine of Inclusio Unius, Exclusio Alterius, we need to get the Federal Government out of the Education business.  It is plainly a matter for the states and the people (Amendment X).  Goverment Controlled education stifles freedom and innovation. 

Economic Concerns

  Can local school districts survive without Federal Funding?  Is the loss in freedom and achievement worth the cost of preserving state mandated learning goals that are not achieved by the economically poorest local schools?  Throwing Federal Money at failing schools has achieved next to nothing for the students, but the politicians owned by the teacher's unions (i.e., Democrats) want to preserve the status quo so that the power of union money keeps them in power.  God's Chidren deserve our love and the freedom that comes from critical thinking skills.   

First Amendment Concerns

  If the successful (for students) schools in poor neighborhoods are religiously based, would taxpayer payment of tuition violate the Establishment and Freedom of Religion clauses in the First Amendment?  Thus far, our Supreme Court has held that it does not (Zelmanv.Simmons-Harris,(2002), and that school vouchers can be used at religiously based schools. Are God's  children better off with a sound education or the prevalent warehouse system?  Your vote counts; one party (Republicans) favors choice, the other favors continuation of the status quo regardless of student outcomes.